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Sapphire Class 2017-2018

 

Welcome to the Sapphire class page!

      Here you will find links to useful websites, information about our learning, recent activities and options to download key documents.

                    Select the Photo tab to see photos of our learning activities and events.

 I am contactable at jpearson@netherfield.e-sussex.sch.uk should you have any queries or concerns.

Important documents

Letter -join

Welcome to our new handwriting scheme. Handwriting is a very important element of school life, and the associated skills need to be taught carefully. We have adopted the Letter-Join strategy for handwriting across the entire school and cursive script will be taught to everyone. We would love you to encourage your children to practise using the new letter formation! Details of how to download resources are available below. 

Purple Mash

A reminder that we have joined the Purple Mash community for teaching and learning computing and digital literacy. The children all have their own logins to access the games , activites and programs on the website, and they will be able to explain to you how it all works. If they have forgotten their login, we have a record of them and will be able to provide them to you! Click the picture to go to the login page.

Purple Mash(1)

Term 3

Beat Band Boogie!

Boom, boom, boom, parrup, bah-dum TISH! Here comes the marching band! Left, right, left, right... Atten-SHUN!  Step in time to the beat: 1,2,3,4, let's make sounds, high and low.

That sound is loud! That one's quiet...Shhhh, listen up! What can you hear? There are sounds all around. What's making each one?

Name all the instruments in the bandand be part of a 'body orchestra'! Pat your knees, clap your hands, tap your feet, let's move to the beat.

Now march up the hill with the Grand Old Duke of York, beating your drum or shaking your shaker.

Then it's time to perform... Oh, what a performance! Your audience loves you, so let's take a bow!

Image result for marching band

Did you know...

Percussion originates from the Latin, percussio ('to hit'), and means 'hitting one body against another'.

The first percussion instruments were probably human hands and feet used to clap or stomp a rhythm. Eventually, cultures discovered that htey could create louder, more varied sounds with crafted surfaces and implements.

The first horns were made not of brass, but of natural elements such as conch shells and animal horns. 

Curving the tubes of brass insturments makes them easier to hold and play. Even a small trumpet would be over six feet long if laid out as a single tube!

Some large bass tubas called sousaphones used in marching bands, are partly made from fibreglass to make them lighter and easier to carry.

Trumpets were used long ago in Ancient Egypt. However, it was only in 1820 that the valve was invented, creating the trumpetdesign we know today. Valves allow the player to play a wider range of notes by changing the length of the tube through which the air travels.

The largest brass band comprised 15,761 musicians who gathered to play at a stadium in Leipzig, Germany on 1st June 2008. The stadium was so vast that there was a two-second delay between the conductor and the music!

The largest drum kit ever, constructed by Mark Temprato, consisted of 813 pieces and weighed more then 2,230kg. It took him an hour to strike every piece!

According to the guiness Book of Records, the largest drum in the world measures 5.54 m in diameter, is 5.96m tall and weighs 7 tonnes. It was created in South Korea. Where do they keep it?

Useful Websites

Nursery rhymes

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star – BBC

Nursery rhyme video with lyrics.

This Old Man – BBC

Nursery rhyme video with lyrics.

The Grand Old Duke of York – BBC
Nursery rhyme video with lyrics. 

Hot Cross Buns – Songs for Teaching

Song lyrics and sound clip.

Making musical instruments

Homemade musical instruments – Pinterest

Inspiring images for making musical instruments.

How to make musical instruments for kids – Howcast

Guides for making a range of musical instruments.

Trooping the Colour

Trooping the Colour (2011) – BBC

Video clip. This could be contrasted with a clip from Trooping the Colour (1951).

Trooping the Colour (2001) – The British Grenadiers

Break into quick time! – YouTube

Two-minute amateur footage of the marching band outside Buckingham Palace. Shows instruments up-close.

Opera singing – BBC

Clip of Lesley Garrett singing for a small audience of children and showing them how she warms up her voice.

Swiss yodelling – YouTube

Video clip showing a yodeller performing for a TV studio audience.

Acapella performance of Africa by Toto – Videosift

Video clip showing a choir performing the song Africa by Toto, preceded by an impressive percussive ‘storm’.

Inuit throat singing – National Geographic

Short clip showing extraordinary Inuit throat singing. Explains how the singing started as a game.

Native American chant – Songs of the Spheres

Audio clips of Native American chanting.

Scat singing – YouTube

1969 footage of Ella Fitzgerald – singing begins at 40 seconds.

The Steadfast Tin Soldier

The Steadfast Tin Soldier – Storynory

Free audio stream and download of ‘The Steadfast Tin Soldier’. You can also read the text or print out the story.

Body drumming

Body drumming - Youtube

A one-minute video of body drumming. 

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